Greens Classic Scones Mix

Green's Scone Mix

It goes without saying that my dessert of choice would be the scone. Think Canadian tea biscuit, only better or American biscuit, with far less salt and far better tasting. Where ever my travels take me, I am always on the hunt for a proper scone.  I have been to some great bakeries and sampled some amazing scones, but have yet to come close to what I regard as a proper Scottish scone. Proper, defined as a plain scone, which tastes like those we would find across the pond in Scotland and even Ireland. (I’ve never been to England, but I assume they haven’t got a clue on what a proper scone should taste like. And Yes, I understand that Green’s is located in England, but I’m going to assume they had some help from the north. ) I’d even accept a fruit scone, which in Scottish terms means it contains currants. In Canada, our love of sugar has led me down a trail to what I call designer scones. Great tasting, satisfying and overly fancy; with white chocolate vanilla bean raspberry, topped with large sugar crystals, but not what I am looking for when I require a proper scone.

In addition to being a writer on the internet, I also play both a theorist and chemist. My theory on finding a proper scone here in Canada is that it would require much work to produce, due to the fact that we cannot control many of the variables involved; the ingredients themselves. Even if some little old lady in Scotland mailed me her recipe for traditional Scottish scones, I am unable to control any of the other variables. Canadian butter, milk, flour, eggs are different from that of the UK. Food is grown and processed differently here in Canada, and can have a different taste affecting the final product. My theory also proposes that, although we may come close to replicating a proper scone, we may require more work than simply following a recipe line by line. We may need to experiment with different types of flour or butter, and even play around with the volume of ingredients used. All that to say we can’t technically produce a proper scone, I’m just saying I haven’t found it yet because of the level of difficulty and perhaps our cultural dietary  palette.

Luckily, I have come across the simple solution to fulfilling my needs for a proper scone that doesn’t involve hours of experimenting in the kitchen. Green’s Classic Scone Mix. I am world-renowned for my box mix baking, so when I came across this product at the Scottish and Irish Store it was a no-brainer.

Green’s Easy Mix Scones was as  easy as turning on the oven, adding milk and egg, and mixing it into a dough. Bust out the rolling-pin, use an upside down glass to cut some scones and allow to rise for 10 minutes before baking for 11. The result, 7 beautifully golden scones that I must now resist the urge to devour in a single sitting. For those of you mathematicians who count 6 of the scones I baked, the 7th was actually hand shaped using the leftover dough and didn’t make the cut for the photo shoot. Discriminant, I know.

Green's Classic Scones Mix
The scones that Scott baked.

The taste of the scones are amazing, my mouth is watering just thinking about them. Nice and light, the right amount of crumble and the right amount of moisture. They have a nice organic taste, like Grandma Gussy’s baking. The taste is also quite similar to what I would expect from a proper scone, and is by far the closest I have found without having to actually travel to Scotland to buy them. The texture differed slightly than a proper scone, which I attribute to the wheat flour used over a traditional all-purpose flour. Certainly not a negative point as I did enjoy the texture, just stating that I found a small difference. Obviously you can add whatever you want as well, but I’ll take mine as they are out of the box.

Plain and simple, these are a must for anyone with a love of scones, proper or fancy. Whether you prefer butter, jam, clotted cream or mocha coffee bean; Green’s Classic Scone Mix has everything you need to bake you some proper scones.

 

 

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